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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission Meeting Schedule for 2014


Virginia Criminal Sentencing Commission (VCSC) holds 4 public meetings each year. 

For 2014 the tentative dates (they’ve been known to change them) are: 
  • Monday April 14, 2014
  • Monday June 9, 2014
  • Monday September 8, 2014
  • Wednesday November 5, 2014
The meetings begin at 10am and usually end by 12-noon. 

Members of the VCSC are http://www.vcsc.virginia.gov/about.html 

The VCSC staff  is tasked with legislative fiscal impact submissions for all proposed bills at the yearly General Assembly session. 6 out of 9 years "Sex Offender" Bills have been #1 for filed legislation that would result in money being needed if it became law in the Commonwealth.
 
    • In 2013 there were 52 Sex Offender (#1) and 39 Fraud/Larceny (#2) analyses.
    • In 2012 there were 71 Sex Offender (#1) and 29 Fraud/Larceny (#2) analyses.
    • In 2011 there were 47 Drug (#1), 29 Sex Offender (#2) and 19 Protective Order (#3) analyses.
    • In 2010 there were 27 Murder (#1), 16 Assault (#2), 16 Sex Offender (#3) and 13 Gangs (#4) analyses.
    • In 2009 there were 15 Sex Offender (#1) and 13 Weapons (#2) analyses.
    • In 2008 there were 53 Sex Offender (#1) and 29 Prisoner/Offender (#2) analyses.
    • In 2007 there were 68 Sex Offender (#1) and 30 Illegal Aliens (#2) analyses.
    • In 2006 there were 86 Sex Offender (#1) and 30 Drug (#2) analyses.
    • In 2005 there were 48 Drug (#1), 25 Computer Crimes (#2) this category would include Computer Solicitation of a Minor and Child Pornography Production, Possession and Distribution. In reality many of these analyses should be counted under Sex Offender, 23 for both Sex Offender (#3) and Firearms and 19 Gangs (#4) analyses.
Impact Analyses from Virginia General Assembly:
                                                               2013      2012         2011        2010      2009       2008       2007       2006      2005
Expansion or Clarification of Crime* 51.6%     63.2%        87.2%       66.7%      60.7%      45.4%       44.9%       39.0%      31.3%
New Crime*                                          42.9%     40.8%       26.5%        16.4%      32.5%      36.5%       33.1%        41.7%       37.9%
Mandatory Minimum*                          10.2%      17.7%        12.8%         3.4%         8.5%        2.3%        11.8%       10.4%         4.9%
Misdemeanor to a Felony*                    29.2%      17.3%        10.9%        11.1%         6.0%      15.8%       10.6%       16.1%        16.5%
Increase Felony Punishment*              7.1%        7.2%           2.8%         0%            0%          8.2%        12.2%        11.4%         7.4%

* Percentages do not add to 100%, since proposed legislation can involve multiple types of changes. Multiple analyses may be performed on each bill, depending on the number of amended and substitute versions that are proposed or adopted

I’d be interested to know from these percentages of proposed legislation based on fiscal impact analyses and that “Sex offender” bills were the #1 request 6 out of 9 years what the percentages of bills that became law are.  

If the #1 request for proposed legislation is “Sex Offender” then is the #1 successfully passed into law also “Sex Offender” or has it been something else like Murder, Fraud/Larceny, Drug, Death Penalty or Weapons? I’m betting except for 2006, 2007 and 2008 which were big years for newly passed Sex Offender laws  in a failed attempt to become Federal Adam Walsh Act (AWA) compliant that we would discover from 2009 to 2014 that out of the bills actually signed into law “Sex Offender” is NOT #1 or even in the top 5 because most of the Sex Offender proposals are really “brochure bills”. No one expects them to become law, they only submit/patron them so they can later promote their “tough-on-crime” stance against those “heinous predators” in their campaign brochures and commercials. 

It would also be interesting to know what the number were pre-2005 since the VCSC has been in existence for 19 years. 

Or, how many misdemeanors are now felonies, over the last 19 years. I bet that number is really high.

I look forward to learning what the #1 request of the 2014 Virginia General Assembly session was at the first VCSC meeting of 2014. I will be sure to share the 2014 numbers with all of you. 

Mary Devoy