Twitter

Saturday, October 18, 2014

Two New Books on Teen Sexting


Two New Books on Teen Sexting being released in: 

February 2015:
By Amy Adele Hasinoff 

Summary:
Sexting Panic illustrates that anxieties about technology and teen girls sexuality distract from critical questions about how to adapt norms of privacy and consent for new media. Though mobile phones can be used to cause harm, Amy Adele Hasinoff notes that the criminalization and abstinence policies meant to curb sexting often fail to account for distinctions between consensual sharing and malicious distribution. Challenging the idea that sexting inevitably victimizes young women, Hasinoff argues for recognizing young people's capacity for choice and encourages rethinking the assumption that everything digital is public. 

Timely and engaging, Sexting Panic analyzes the debates about sexting while recommending realistic and nuanced responses. 

December 2014: 
By Shaneen Shariff 
 

Summary:
Directed at policy makers, legislators, educators, parents, members of the legal community, and anyone concerned about current public policy responses to sexting and cyberbullying, this book examines the lines between online joking and legal consequences. It offers an analysis of reactive versus preventive legal and educational responses to these issues using evidence-based research with digitally empowered kids. Shaheen Shariff highlights the influence of popular and "rape" culture on the behavior of adolescents who establish sexual identities and social relationships through sexting. She argues that we need to move away from criminalizing children and toward engaging them in the policy-development process, and she observes that important lessons can be learned from constitutional and human rights frameworks. She also draws attention to the value of children's literature in helping the legal community better understand children's moral development - and the judicial approaches and biases in assessing children's culpability - and in helping children clarify the lines between harmless jokes and harmful postings that could land them in jail.