Twitter

Friday, August 8, 2014

New Book: The Autism Spectrum, Sexuality and the Law: What Every Parent and Professional Needs to Know by Tony Attwood, Isabelle Henault and Nick Dubin

 
I am always looking for new reading material on Sex Offenders, Registries, the Civil Commitment of SVP’s, Juvenile Offending, Moral Panics and our Justice System. I haven’t read a “for fun” book in over 6 or 7 years. The last book that I “posted” about was by a VCU Asst. Professor back in December. 

A topic that I have previously lamented about (exactly one year ago) on this blog was, Are Autistic People More Likely to be Labeled a Sex Offender? 

Today while searching for new books I came across this one, The Autism Spectrum, Sexuality and the Law: What every parent and professional needs to know by Tony Attwood, Isabelle Henault and Nick Dubin.   Scheduled release date, August 21, 2014. 

I have pre-ordered this book and am looking forward to reading it! 

For those parents who have reached out to me over the last 6 years because your teenage or young adult child with autism has been wrongly swept up by our overly broad sexual laws that has stigmatized them with the undeserved and life destroying label of Violent Sex Offender, I wanted you to know about this book.

Mary Devoy 

Here is the synopsis from Amazon.com: 

Based on Nick Dubin's own experience, and drawing on the extensive knowledge of Dr Tony Attwood and Dr Isabelle Hénault, this important book addresses the issues surrounding the autism spectrum, sexuality and the law.

The complex world of sex and appropriate sexual behaviour can be extremely challenging for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and, without guidance, many find themselves in vulnerable situations. This book examines how the ASD profile typically affects sexuality and how sexual development differs between the general population and those with ASD. It explains the legalities of sexual behaviour, how laws differ from country to country, and the possibility for adjustment of existing laws as they are applied to the ASD population. With advice on how to help people with autism spectrum disorder gain a better understanding of sexuality and a comprehensive list of resources, the book highlights the need for a more informed societal approach to the psychosexual development of people with ASD.