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Thursday, August 14, 2014

American Bar Association’s National Inventory of Collateral Consequences of Conviction Lists ALL Prohibitions on Benefits and Employment for Registered Sex Offenders Across the U.S.

 
Today is day 4 out of 5 for the Slate.com series on Sex Offender laws with a final summary including recommendations expected tomorrow. 

In today’s brief article there is a 5 Question Quiz on what jobs are legally prohibited for Registered Sex Offenders. 

Anyone who doesn’t want to know the answers to the quiz because you want to take it, stop reading right now! 
 

Polygraphs Don't Work. So Why Do We Still Use Them? By Joseph Stromber

 
Over the many years of advocating for data-driven reform of Virginia’s Sex Offender Registry and laws I have touched on polygraph testing or “lie-detectors” as those who believe they can actually detect a lie usually refer to them.
  • August 5, 2013
  • August 2012         10-25-14: The  RSOL-VA Website is no more, I decided not to renew (pay for) another year of web-hosting I'm sorry!-Mary
  • October 7, 2010   10-25-14: The  RSOL-VA Website is no more, I decided not to renew (pay for) another year of web-hosting I'm sorry!-Mary
  • June 22, 2009     10-25-14: The  RSOL-VA Website is no more, I decided not to renew (pay for) another year of web-hosting I'm sorry!-Mary
Today I came across the below article on polygraphs and decided to share it. 

Mary Davye Devoy
 

Polygraphs don't work. So why do we still use them? August 14, 2014
By Joseph Stromber

The FBI gives a polygraph test to every single person who's considered for a job there. When the DEA, CIA, and other agencies are taken into account, about 70,000 people a year submit to polygraphs while seeking security clearances and jobs with the federal government. 

Polygraphs are also regularly used by law enforcement when interrogating suspects. In some places, they're used to monitor the activities of sex offenders on probation, and some judges have recently permitted plea bargains that hinge on the results of defendants' polygraph tests. 

Here's what makes this all so baffling: the question of whether polygraphs are a good way to figure out whether someone is lying was settled long ago. They aren't.