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Friday, January 23, 2015

New Book in April 2015 - Protecting Our Kids?: How Sex Offender Laws Are Failing Us by Emily Horowitz


I just preordered my copy (see below)! I’ve also added it to the Books, Studies, Reports page. 

At the moment I’m 1/3 the way through The Autism Spectrum, Sexuality and the Law: What every parent and professional needs to know, an excellent read and the first I’ve found on this topic. 

Mary 

 
Protecting Our Kids?: How Sex Offender Laws Are Failing Us by Emily Horowitz
Release Date April 30, 2015 

Summary: 

Do sex offender laws protect children, or are they inherently unfair practices that, at their worst, promote vigilante justice? The latter, this book argues. By analyzing the social, political, historical, and cultural context surrounding the emergence of current sex offender policies and laws, the work shows how sex offenders have come to loom as greater-than-life monsters when, in many cases, that is not true at all. Looking at its subject from a fresh viewpoint, the book shares research and new analyses of data and qualitative evidence to show how sex-offender laws are not only ineffective, but engender destructive fear and anxiety.  

To help readers understand the impact of these laws, the author presents interviews with sex offenders and their families as they describe the day-to-day reality of living on the sex offender registry. Citing research and statistics, the book challenges the idea that sex offenders must be continually monitored and publicly identified because they are incurably predatory. Most important, the study shows that undue sex offender panic is preventing policymakers from addressing the true threats to children—poverty and growing inequality. 
 

Review:

  • Provides research-based evidence that the mean-spirited and panic-driven sex offender laws, aimed at branding a group of offenders as inhuman and unworthy of civil liberties and human rights, increases fear, destroys the lives of offenders and their families, and fails to protect children
  • Shows that emphasizing sex offenders and stranger-danger as the primary threat to child well-being and safety prevents focus on and attention to policies that prevent far more pervasive forms of child abuse, such as physical abuse, neglect, and maltreatment
  • Analyzes the sociohistorical context surrounding the emergence of current draconian sex offender policies
  • Challenges the idea that sex offenders must be continually monitored and publicly identified
  • Tells the stories of convicted sex offenders and their families and how they survive in a society that views them as the "worst of the worst"