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Sunday, October 25, 2015

Lenore Skenazy Over at Free-Range Kids Posts About an Autistic Man Who is in Jail with $100,000 Bail Simply for Talking to Some Kids


Autistic Man in Jail for Talking to Some Kids, October 25, 2015
By Lenore Skenazy

A Philadelphia area man with autism is being held on $100,000 bail for talking to some children.
 

Eric Adler: Brodie Leap says he felt pressured as a boy to say his father Earnest Leap had touched him inappropriately. Now 31, Brodie is trying to get his father’s name off Missouri’s sex offender registry. Across the U.S., more are questioning the public benefit, legality and appropriateness of registries.

Earnest Leap and Brodie Leap (right)

Update:
Radley Balko: Son falsely accuses father of sexual abuse, spends life trying to undo the damage, October 29, 2015
 
 

‘Lie’ begets lifetime of regret for Clay County father, son, October 24, 2015
By Eric Adler
·         Brodie Leap says he felt pressured as a boy to say his father had touched him inappropriately
·         Now 31, Brodie is trying to get his father’s name off Missouri’s sex offender registry
·         Across the U.S., more are questioning the public benefit, legality and appropriateness of registries
 

Brodie Leap was 5 years old when he told what he now calls The Lie. 

He says he knew it was a lie the second he said it. He is 31 now, living in Oakview in Clay County, and he has known his entire life that it wasn’t true. 

“Have you been touched down there?” his mother asked him.

Leap insists he told the truth at first. “No,” he recalls repeating to his mother as she asked him time and again. The date was Dec. 1, 1989. Karen Leap, then 36, was asking her son about his father and her ex-husband, Earnest Leap. 

The couple, separated for three years, had just ended their seven-year marriage that September. Despite their bitter parting, the parents received joint custody of Brodie and his toddler brother, Josh. 

To Karen Leap’s grave disappointment, Earnest Leap was named prime custodial parent, meaning the boys lived mostly with him. 

“Have you been touched down there?” 

The answer that Brodie Leap finally uttered, and which for the past eight years he has declared in affidavits he felt hounded to give, continues to haunt the life of his father, who both Leap brothers attest has been the most supportive and positive force in their lives.