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Friday, May 13, 2016

Justice Policy Journal Spring 2016 Volume Includes…. Bad Data: How government agencies distort statistics on sex-crime recidivism AND Deconstructing a Puzzling Relationship: Sex Offender Legislation, the Crimes that Inspired It, and Sustained Moral Panic


I just learned about the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice http://www.cjcj.org/index.html  today! Thanks to a long-time follower/supporter.

They have many “Sex Offender” papers going back many years. 
 

So I’m just sharing the two most recent pieces here, you can search their website for more. 

Enjoy. 

Mary Devoy
 

From the Justice Policy Journal Volume 13, Number 1 - Spring 2016 http://www.cjcj.org/news/10396#Bad Data 

Bad Data: How government agencies distort statistics on sex-crime recidivism
By Alissa R. Ackerman and Marshall Burns

Abstract: Data on the recidivism rates of individuals convicted of sex crimes varies considerably across studies. Both academic papers and government reports have assessed various forms of recidivism for this group, with different findings. The vast majority of the public believes that people convicted of sex crimes will inevitably reoffend and this is the premise upon which most related legislation is based. However, this premise is based on false and misleading information contained in numerous published reports. After a review of 287 studies of recidivism statistics, we selected seven that exhibit the most egregious misinformation and that have been the most influential in shaping governmental policy. We examine these seven studies thoroughly to better understand their definitions, interpretation, and presentation of recidivism data. We then seek to resolve discrepancies and to determine what can legitimately be said about sex-crime recidivism. We then discuss new revelations about recidivism and sex crimes vis-a-vis our analysis and we offer suggestions for future research. 

Deconstructing a Puzzling Relationship: Sex Offender Legislation, the Crimes that Inspired It, and Sustained Moral Panic
By Nancy G. Calleja

Abstract: Sex offender legislation has expanded significantly over the last two decades with progressively harsher sanctions and with the inclusion of juvenile offenders. However, several of the crimes upon which the legislation was established are only loosely related to the resulting laws, and none of the crimes were perpetrated by juveniles—making it even more difficult to understand the intent and scope of the legislation today. This article re-examines the history of sex offender legislation since the 1990’s and the crimes that served as catalysts for the legislation. Moral panic and its potential role in current sex offender legislation is briefly explored while an argument is made for the exclusion of juvenile offenders in sex offender legislation.