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Sunday, January 10, 2016

USA Today Column: Virginia Law Should Exempt Anyone Under 18 Years of Age from Child Pornography Law


Great piece! Except it wasn’t a D.C. detective, it was a Manassas Virginia detective. 

I’ve been saying for a few years now Virginia needs to add an age gap allowance of 4 years so any teens including (18 and 19 year olds) couldn’t be swept up in our Child Pornography laws by overzealous Commonwealth’s Attorneys and Legislators who are on such a Moral-High Horse they refuse to admit teenagers think about sex, talk about sex, and willingly participate in sexual acts. And because of that willful ignorance many teens continue to face the possibility of criminal charges, investigations, public humiliation and possible registration as a Sex Offender when the authorities find out what they have on their phones. 

Mary Devoy 
 

Perverting teen sexting laws, January 10, 2016
By Robby Soave
Laws that punish minors as sex offenders for perfectly normal behaviors harm teenagers.

A D.C.-area police detective who investigated teen “sexting” — i.e. teens texting nude photos of themselves to each other — killed himself last month as officers tried to arrest him on pedophilia charges. The allegations, if true, represent a grave betrayal of the public’s trust. But people should not settle for outrage over the irony of this detective’s personal failings.  

They should also demand reform of sexting laws that require agents of the state to violate teenagers’ bodies. 

Police detective David Abbott first made headlines in the summer of 2014 for his involvement in the investigation of a Manassas, Va., 17-year-old, who had swapped naked pictures with his 15-year-old girlfriend. The authorities sought a warrant to transport the teen to a medical facility, inject him with drugs that would give him an erection and photograph his genitals. They deemed this unbelievably invasive course of action necessary to determine whether the young man had, in fact, sent his girlfriend inappropriate photos. When the teen’s lawyer remarked that the warrant was “crazy,” Abbott sued her for defaming him. 

Eventually, the 17-year-old received a year of probation — and social media exile — for swapping consensual nude photos with his girlfriend. Abbott’s alleged inappropriate relationship with two boys, ages 11 and 13, came to light only recently.  

Whether the detective’s proclivities played any role in his overzealous quest to obtain pictures through the legal system is unknown. 
 

Virginia Delegate Chris Peace Drafts Bill That Will be Known as “Eli’s Law” to Water-Down the Already Bloated VSP Registry By Adding Child Abusers to the Virginia Sex Offender Registry, Peace Says the Costs “will be Marginal”


Mother of assaulted Hanover baby works to put violent felons on registry, January 8, 2016
By Bill Fitzgerald

HANOVER COUNTY, Va. -- When you look for a new home, you may check the sex offender registry to see whether an offender lives in the area. 

But what about violent felons who have hurt children? They may not be on that list.  A mother who has lived through an unspeakable act of brutality against her baby wants to change that. 

"He was blue. He was struggling to breathe. His head was falling forwards," Courtney Maddox said, describing that terrifying day five years ago. 

For anyone unfamiliar with the story, what happened is almost unimaginable.